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Monthly Archives: March 2013

Be Very Afraid

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Each year a selection of ingenious students – from primary to university age – are invited along to BAFTA in London’s Piccadilly to show and talk about the extraordinary things they are doing with new technologies in their learning.

Guests attend by invitation: from the senior policy making echelons of the Whitehall Department of Education & Skills, and the Department for Culture, Media and Sport; from BAFTA’s own membership of film and theatre arts luminaries; from other influential organisations.

During the day the students explain just what it is that they are doing. Each year is more ambitious; each year poses real questions for policymakers and parents as the ambitions of these 21st century learners, together with their ability to deliver on these ambitions, becomes apparent.

Although we limit the scale of these conversations and demonstrations on the day, they are captured annually as a DVD, a web-site, podcasts and as photographs so that many thousands around the world can enjoy the event and be inspired too.

See on www.heppell.net

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Books to read…

The following list are recommended by Daniel Pink and his readers in his book, “Drive”.  First, if you haven’t read Pink’s book, put it at the top of your list.  Because I love the insights and strategies Pink submits, I am definitely going to try to read some, if not all, of these books.  If you have any insight about which ones I should read first, I welcome your feedback.

Daniel Pink - PopTech 2007 - Camden, ME

Daniel Pink – PopTech 2007 – Camden, ME (Photo credit: Kris Krug)

Pink’s Reader’s Recommendations:

  1. The Talent Code – Daniel Coyle (This was just recommended to me by a friend)
  2. Encore – Marc Freedman
  3. Rework – Jason Fried and David Heinemeier Hansson
  4. Linchpin – Seth Godin (I love this author and blogger – This may top my list)
  5. Just Listen – Mark Goulston
  6. Switch – Chip Heath and Dan Heath
  7. Delivering Happiness – Tony Hsieh
  8. Teach like a Champion – Doug Lemov
  9. Mastery – George Leonard
  10. Employees First, Customers Second – Vineer Nayar
  11. How full is your Bucket? – Tom Rath and Donald O. Clifton
  12. Wellbeing – Tom Rath and Jim Harter
  13. Learned Optimisim – Martin E. P. Siligman
  14. Do More Great Work – Michael Bungay Stanier
  15. Start with Why – Simon Sinek
  16. The Motivated Student – Bob Sullo
  17. Good Boss, Bad Boss – Bob Sutton
  18. Intrinsic Motivation at Work – Kenneth W. Tomas
  19. Wooden Leadership – John Wooden and Steve Jamison

Pink’s Recommendations:

The reason I am putting two of the books at the top of my list is because I have heard a few people talking about them.  I suppose this is why I read most of the books that I do-either recommendation, talk around the water cooler, they are on a list for school, and now because they are on a list from an author who I respect and enjoy reading.

Personally, I would add Freakonomics, SuperFreakonomics, Blur, and any books that Malcolm Gladwell or Seth Godin wrote to this list.

 
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Posted by on March 25, 2013 in Education

 

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Welcome to Good Work | goodwork

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Our GoalsGrow a vibrant network of resilient community entrepreneurs from all walks of lifeCollaborate with others to improve services, policies, and community leadership that support community entrepreneurs Our Values and Organizing PrinciplesEducation and lifelong learningResilienceSelf-relianceEconomic literacyEntrepreneurshipMeaningful work and good jobsQuality goods and servicesStewardship and sustainability Servant leadershipBeloved community
See on goodwork.org

 
 

MindSet: A Book written by Carol Dweck. Teaching a growth mindset creates motivation and productivity in the worlds of business, education, and sports.

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Every so often a truly groundbreaking idea comes along. This is one. Mindset explains:

Why brains and talent don’t bring successHow they can stand in the way of itWhy praising brains and talent doesn’t foster self-esteem and accomplishment, but jeopardizes themHow teaching a simple idea about the brain raises grades and productivityWhat all great CEOs, parents, teachers, athletes know
See on mindsetonline.com

 
 

Education, Home School, Magazine, Learning, Homeschooling, Family, News. | Network – HEM | all about unschooling and family life – from Home Education Magazine

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Home Education Magazine – HEM Network – Families, Homeschooling, Homeschools, Groups, How to learn or teach, 28 yrs, 10,000 pages, Laws, Home school online, help.

See on homeedmag.com

 
 

Unschooling.com

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Unschooling is a vibrant life.

Unschooling is a method of homeschooling that puts the desire, drive, motive and responsibility for life – this thing we call learning, or education – in the hands of the learner.

Unschooling is what defines a life lived on one’s own terms, whether you’re a child, a teen or an adult.

Unschooling children are supported to pursue, or self direct, the myriad of things that are of interest to them, eat foods they enjoy and in quantities that are satisfying, sleep and rest according to their individual needs, choose friends of all ages or none at all, engage in the world in unique and powerful and self directed ways.

Unschooling learners are interdependent. In partnership with their parents, other adults, friendships, acquaintances, groups, communities and others, they learn to navigate the world, resource their interests, discover their vital roles and responsibilities in their own as well as other’s lives.

Unschooling families have learned how to listen deeply to one another, communicate respectfully and with love, to support each other’s interests and desires.

Unschooling parents have learned to trust the natural unfolding of the empowered learning process in their children, whether they be infants, toddlers, 10 or 17 or 30.

The process of unschooling is not a guarantee of a successful and satisfying and productive life, but when lived fully and responsibly, there is enormous evidence to show that it leads to intelligent, mature, thoughtful, compassionate, confident and highly capable persons, as children, teens and adults.

See on unschooling.com

 
 

Why Waldorf Works – Home

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Waldorf Education has grown from its humble beginnings in North America to include more than 160 schools across the continent, 250 early childhood centers, 17 teacher preparation institutes, 1 school entirely adapted for children with special needs, 1 school adopted by Native Americans and 8 schools with educational programs designed in partnership with farms practicing organic or biodynamic agriculture. So as you can see, this independent school movement has grown to have a huge reach and influence across the continent and remains as exciting and challenging as the day it started.

See on whywaldorfworks.org

 
 
 
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