Instructional Design – Cognitive Overload

28 Nov

This is the first video in a series involving key ideas in instructional design.  It has technology integrated through authentic means in the lesson.  It is meant to induce cognitive overload, but embeds a lot of information about instructional design in doing so.  Watch this video as a comparison.  This video specifically explores: 

  • Split Attention Effect
  • Cognitive Overload
  • Learning Styles
  • Primacy and Recency
  • Presentation of the Whole Task (Pebbles in the Pond)
  • Searching for Misconceptions
  • Looking for Evidence
  • Multimodal Presentation
  • Prior Knowledge
  • Creating an Atmosphere of Problem-Solving
  • Instructivist and Constructivist Techniques
  • Motivation
  • Choice
  • Differentiation

References and Resources

Clark, R. E. (1983). Reconsidering research on learning media. Review of Educational Research, 53(4), 445-459.

Clark, R. E. (1994). Media will never influence learning. Educational Technology Research and Development, 42(2), 21-29.

Dunn, R., Beaudry, J. S., & Klavas, A. (2002). Survey of research on learning styles. California Journal of Science Education, II(2), 76-98. Retrieved from

Hattie, J. (1999). Influences on student learning. Retrieved from

Hmelo-Silver, C. E., Duncan, R. G., & Chinn, C. A. (2007). Scaffolding and achievement in problem-based and inquiry learning: A response to Kirschner, Sweller, and Clark (2006). Educational Psychologist, 42(2), 99-107.

Kirschner, P. A., Sweller, J., & Clark, R. E. (2006). Why minimal guidance during instruction does not work: An analysis of the failure of constructivist, discovery, problem-based, experimental, and inquiry-based teaching. Educational Psychologist, 41(2), 75-86.

Kozma, R. B. (1991). Learning with media. Review of Educational Research, 61(2), 179-212.

Lovelace, M. K. (2005, January/February). Meta-analysis of experimental research based on the Dunn and Dunn model.  Journal of Educational Research, 98(3), 176-183.

Martinez, M. E. (2010). Learning and cognition: The design of the mind. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

Silber, K. H. (2010). A principle-based model of instructional design. In K. H. Silber, & W. R. Foshay (Series Ed.), Handbook of Improving Performance in the Workplace: Vol. 1. Instructional design and training delivery, (pp. 23-52). San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer.

van Gog, T., Ericsson, K. A., Rikers, R. M., & Paas, F. (2005). Instructional design for advanced learners: Establishing connections between the theoretical frameworks of cognitive load and deliberate practice. Educational Technology, Research and Development, 53(3), 73-81. Retrieved from

van Merriënboer, J. J., & Ayres, P. (2005). Research on cognitive load theory and its design implications for e-learning. Educational Technology, Research and Development, 53(3), 5-13. Retrieved from

1 Comment

Posted by on November 28, 2013 in Education, Technology


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